• Violet Mackintosh

Press 5* (Edinburgh Fringe Review)

Black Bat Productions

Pleasance Courtyard - Cabaret Bar


Press follows the story of two movie producers in their real-time panic to cover up a huge mistake portrayed in the latest film they released. It turns out that the biopic’s main character, who was portrayed by a white actor, was in reality black. As twitter turns on them, David and Kate frantically call, text, and email their way out of being nominated for awards, hoping to brush the film under the carpet, along with the horrendous error. It is a wonderful set-up and it delivers in every manner.


"It is a wonderful set-up and it delivers in every manner."

Press - Black Bat Productions


Before the start, David (Nathaniel Brimmer-Beller) comes out of his pre-set character to address the audience as the writer/director and explaining that, in true 2021 style, this play was subject to a covid crisis 72 hours before curtains up. Both actors who were originally cast had to isolate, leaving two rather large holes in the play. Brimmer-Bellar stepped in as David and Rosie Hart as Kate. The quality of the performance was so immense that no explanation was needed, but, knowing that the play was the product of such magnificent efforts certainly added to the overall appreciation,


One could hardly imagine that Hart’s performance was the product of three days’ worth of line memorisation. Both actors filled the Pleasance Cabaret Bar with bold, confident performances and we could well and truly believe the impact this colossal mistake was having on their characters. They captivated us with every twist and turn in their hastily-conceived master plan to dismantle the film’s credit as quickly as they built it up again.


"Fringe theatre does not get much better than this, especially with the story that comes behind putting this production on its feet."

The space was not particularly conducive to such a spectacular performance but both did the best with what they had, and the fast-paced script left little room for the performance to feel in any way static.


Fringe theatre does not get much better than this, especially with the story that comes behind putting this on its feet. It is a witty satire of the film industry, tying in important topics of racism and whitewashing within the industry through comedy and intelligent dialogue. If you have any interest in the arts and the politics involved– then this is the one for you.


"If you have any interest in the arts and the politics involved – then this is the one for you."


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